Wildthings Wildlife Rehabilitation Center

Wildlife Emergency's

1. What To Do If I find A Baby Bird ?

  -  First you have to decide if the baby bird really needs saved.

  -   Remember mom's have to leave the nest so she will leave it unattended for short periods of time.  Alone doesn't mean abandonded. Observe it quietly from a distance for awhile.  Is it in really in distress?  Does it look injured?  What are the enviromental factors?  Did you take it away from a cat? 

  -   If you have determined that the bird does need rescued: If at all possible make sure you wear rubber gloves , to stay safe, when you pick up the bird. 

  -  Get a box or other container ready before you grab the bird.  Put old clean rags, or papertowel / Toliet paper in bottom to help keep the bird warm and comfortable. 

  -  Now either put on rubber gloves, or you can turn a plastic grocery bag over your hand. And pick the bird up. If using the bag method make sure your not covering it's head so it can breathe.

  -   Now your ready to put the bird in. Then put the carrier in a quiet, dark place until you can get a hold of the DOW or the rehabber. 

  -   Please don't feed or water unless intructed to do so by a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. 

  -   Next thing, you go wash your hands with anti-bacterial soap. clorox wipes, or something of the sort.  Something that looks and acts perfectly healthy can pass something icky to you or your pets.  For instance a  baby Magpie looks soo cute, but can have Salmonella and pass it on to you or your family if everyone handles this cute baby. These chances are very slim but they're even less if you are careful. Keep in mind you are rescuing a wild thing.

      THEN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE CALL A LICENSED WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR!!

2. What To Do If I Find A Baby Mammal ( bunny, squirrel, raccoon, ect. )?

     First you decided if they need rescuing.

 Remember mom's have to leave their young for unattended periods of time.  Sometime's they leave them in their den / home and sometime's they leave them along the way, where the baby got tired.  Alone doesn't mean abandonded. That mama know's where she left her baby!  Observe it quietly from a distance for awhile.  And 15 minutes is not classified as "awhile".  Mama bunnies usually visit the nest only twice a day.  A fawn's mom may leave it in the early morning and pick it up in the afternoon.  A lot of times that mom is close by that baby, watching the baby while it looks for food.  So, is it really in distress?  Does it look injured?  What are the enviromental factors?  Did you take it away from a cat?  Did it fall out of a tall tree?

We all get involved with the animals because we care about them, that's why we don't want to turn into kidnappers either. The last thing we should do is take that baby away from it's Mama, nobody could ever raise it better. Sometimes it is hard knowing the difference and if something really is in trouble. That's when you call the experts. Wildlife Rehabbers make it their business to learn the wildlife behavior, so does DOW, just to mention a few agencies that can help make the decision. 

My rule of thumb is "if in doubt give either your local DOW office or your local rehabber for advice" before you handle it. 

 -   If determined that the baby does need rescued, keep in mind that cute little baby will bite, scratch ,and claw.  Too, you are big and scary to that baby / or whatever wildlife you are handling.

  -  Talk quietly and try to keep the enviroment as calm as possible.

  -  Get a box or container that the baby won't escape from.  Put some soft ( T shirt is the best ) rags in the bottom, then gently place the baby in. Most mammal babies feel more secure if you cover them . 

  -  Then put the carrier in a quiet, dark place until you can get a hold of the DOW or the rehabber. 

  -   Please don't feed or water unless intructed to do so by a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. 

Next thing you go wash your hands with anti-bacterial soap. clorox wipes, or something of the sort.  Something that looks and acts perfectly healthy can pass something icky to you or your pets.  For instance a wild baby raccoon looks soo cute, but in raccoons dystemper can lay dormant until they get stressed  So your cute raccoon can have the crud and bring it home to your family and pets.  I DEFINITLY am NOT saying to not rescue, I don't know what we ( rehabilitators ) would do without the publics help, just please do it the right way and BE SAFE. 

THEN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE CALL A LICENSED WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR!! 

3. What To Do If I Find A Raptor ( hawk, owl, eagle; baby or adult )?

     The biggest thing to remember with raptors is that they always think they are tuff.  They are the predators and they act like it from little bitty!  Even the babies / or smaller raptors will try to give you a good run for your money.  They are quick with them talons! 

  -  Use welding gloves and throw a towel / small blanket over them. Then scoop them up and into the ready box. 

  -  Please don't put branches or other similar thing's in the container for them to perch on.  Raptors can get their legs broke in transit when the transport person turns a corner and dumps the bird off the perch. Use old T-shirts, blankets for the bottom of the container.

  -  Then take a towel ( or something similar that would work ), and make a horseshoe shape out of it. Lay it on the bottom of the container. This will either give the bird something to prop him up with to help with his breathing or if he is doing better something soft to perch on.

  -  Put them in a quiet, dark place until further instructions from a licensed rehabber. 

  -  Please do not feed or water.  If the bird is over heating ( been sitting in parking lot mid-summer ) you can spray his beak area with water out of a regular squirt bottle, just make sure it is CLEAN WATER. If you have to do this . do it without opening the door / box. All you need is a small space to squirt somewater through.

  -  Next thing, you go wash your hands with anti-bacterial soap. clorox wipes, or something of the sort.  Something that looks and acts perfectly healthy can pass something icky on to you or your pets.  For instance a baby Golden Eagle can have bird trichomosis and make the whole household sick.  So your cool looking bird can have the crud. Please still rescue, just be smart about it to protect yourself and your family!

THEN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE CALL A LICENSED WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR!! 

3.What do I do if I have bear or mountain lion problems?

     If you have problems with anything like these, or bob cat or anything that is big, and scary please call your local DOW office. They are the ones that have the training to safely handle these types of problems.

Transportation

Dow has trained transport people and your local rehabbers  can make transport arragements with you.

  - If you have to transport the wildlife yourself to a facility here are a few quick pointers:

   1. Make sure whatever you are transporting in is sealed well. Even if you have to use tape. If you have to put air holes in the container remember to do it before you put that critter in.

   2. Go straight from your house ( or wherever your starting out from ) to the licensed facility. As great as it is to share this experience with others in your life, your also delaying the length of time the animal / bird will be stressed and without proper medical care. Stress helps kill. In the state of Colorado it is legal to transport from point A to point B ( which should be the rehab facility ), anywhere else without advanced approval can get you ticketed. Let's not turn something cool that your doing into something bad.

  3. Don't put it in your trunk. Try to place it on the floor board or somewhere it will not slide while driving.

  4. If at all possible, please don't take a car full of kids and your pets. I know this is a great experience for all of them but think of it from that wildthings perspective. All those new smell and noises will make it worry the whole trip, is it going to be eaten. In the world of the wild you are either prey or predator.

  5. Try to make the trip as quiet and calm as possible.

  6. If you have anymore questions or concerns when you call to find where you are taking it, ask, all questions are good.

Wildlife Rehabbers

Colorado Wildlife Rehabbers

http://wildlife.state.co.us/rulesregs/

 

Wildlife Rehabbers  in other States

 

 

 

 

Nuisance Problems

 If your having conflict with wildlife, go to the Nuisance Problems page for help with:

  • Pigeons

  • Bats

  • Foxes

  • Raccoons

  • Bears

  • And other critters

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